Maine Internet Options: How to Find the Best Provider for You

Maine Internet Options: How to Find the Best Provider for You

Every day more and more Internet access providers come online. We discovered. The days when one supplier held a monopoly on the market are long gone. You are no longer stuck paying top dollar from an Internet company. But how do you know what options are available to you? It’s simple, go to Broadbandnow.com. Once there, type in your zip code and it will list businesses offering services in your neighborhood with prices and anything else you need to know. Maine’s Total Coverage reporter Jim Keithley stopped by a Portland neighborhood to find Red Zone field technician Nate Pascal on the roof. We adjust it to get the best possible signal,” Pascal told us as he was working. Over time, this stuff is not affected in any way. Its line of sight. is making a name as Maine’s only owned Internet Service Provider. Red Zone has installed 90 towers in all 16 counties. It is a next generation fixed wireless microwave radio, so it sends and receives data between a tower connected in fiber and customers at home, Pascal said. Red Zone CEO and founder Jim McKenna admits that stationary wireless microwave has its limits—wireless is where the future is, there’s no doubt about it. I’d say is, why would you want cable if you don’t need it? Pricing starts at $48 a month, and as Maine’s population ages, they’re offering a $30 deal for those over 60 with a price lock guarantee of five year ways, it’s a race to zero where prices keep going down, but value keeps going up, it really benefits consumers. McKenna said. My wife and I both work from home, and I think at the end of the day it was all about reliability. Noah Burke said. Burke switched from Spectrum to Red Zone a few months ago because he said the customer service was better. For him, he says reliability is more important than speed. It seems like a lot of internet companies are trying to sell you like, 500 megabytes or a gigabyte, which you really don’t need, you know what I mean? People don’t go out and buy cars and say, “What’s the fastest car you have?” Let me drive, I’ll take that car,” Burke said. Speed ​​and reliability are key factors, says Fidium, a Consolidate Communications brand that is pushing hard into fiber and rolling into communities large and small. It’s definitely the future. Right now “You can’t get anything faster. This is the fastest residential service in the state of Maine,” said Marcel Roy, an installation and maintenance engineer for Consolidated Communications. Roy was in the field in South Portland. Fidium has spent $135 million building new fiber lines that are believed to be the gold standard when it comes to high-speed Internet. They can work from home. They can stream as many videos as they need. They can participate in online learning. They can participate in telehealth all of these things without buffering or having issues that typically occur from an Internet connection,” said Sarah Davis, vice president of government affairs for Consolidated Communications. Fidium’s starting price is $70 a month. their headquarters in Portland, explain why fiber is so fast: A fiber is about the size of a hair, very, very thin, and on one end of that fiber is a laser in our central office, on the other end there’s another laser at the customers’ home, and those lasers communicate by firing light back and forth at each other on the same fiber at the speed of light, which is why it provides such high speeds,” said John Arris, supervisor of field operations. busy going from house to house and from neighborhood to neighborhood. We have all 12 connections. Thus, this terminal can have 12 clients working on it. Twelve dedicated fibers,” Roy explained. Consolidated specifically has a five-year plan to build over 400,000 locations in Maine. We’ve started in some of our largest cities in Portland and Falmouth, but we’ve also done very large builds in places you don’t. I would expect Rangeley and the Blue Hill Peninsula and Farmington and New Sharon and Industry and much more rural places than Lisbon Falls, so we’re really trying to reach all areas of the state,” Davis said. There’s more good news, too: Internet options are changing fast, so if they’re not in your area today, they might be tomorrow.

Every day more and more Internet access providers come online.

How can you be sure you’re getting the best deal while still getting the latest and greatest service? We discovered.

The days when one supplier held a monopoly on the market are long gone. You are no longer stuck paying top dollar from an Internet company.

But how do you know what options are available to you? It’s simple, go to Broadbandnow.com. Once there, type in your zip code and it will list businesses offering services in your neighborhood with prices and anything else you need to know.

Maine’s Total Coverage reporter Jim Keithley stopped by a Portland neighborhood to find Red Zone field technician Nate Pascal on the roof.

We adjust it to get the best possible signal,” Pascal told us as he was working. Over time, this stuff is not affected in any way. His line of sight. Once the connection is made, it will stay that way.

The company establishing itself as the only Maine-owned Internet Service Provider. Red Zone has installed 90 towers in all 16 counties.

It’s a next-generation fixed wireless microwave radio, so it sends and receives data between a fiber-connected tower and a customer’s home, Pascal said.

Red Zone CEO and founder Jim McKenna admits the stationary wireless microwave has its limitations — wireless is where the future is, no question about it. The next thing I’d say is, why would you want cable if you don’t need one?

Pricing starts at $48 a month, and as Maine’s population ages, they’re offering a $30 deal for those over 60 with a five-year price lock guarantee.

It’s a consumer market right now. In a sense, it’s a race to zero where prices keep going down, but value keeps going up, it really benefits consumers. McKenna said.

My wife and I both work from home and I think at the end of the day it was all about reliability. Noah Burke said.

Burke switched from Spectrum to Red Zone a few months ago because he said the customer service was better. For him, he says reliability is more important than speed.

It seems like a lot of internet companies are trying to sell you like, 500 megabytes or a gigabyte, which you really don’t need, you know what I mean? People don’t go out and buy cars and say, “What’s the fastest car you have?” Let me drive, I’ll take that car,” Burke said.

Speed ​​and reliability are key factors, says Fidium, a brand of Consolidate Communications that is pushing fiber hard and entering communities large and small.

It’s definitely the future. Right now, you can’t get anything faster. This is the fastest residential service in the state of Maine,” said Marcel Roy, installation and maintenance engineer for Consolidated Communications.

Roy was down in South Portland. Fidium has spent $135 million building new fiber lines that are believed to be the gold standard when it comes to high-speed Internet.

They can work from home. They can stream as many videos as they need. They can participate in online learning. They can participate in telehealth all of these things without buffering or having problems that normally occur from an Internet connection,” said Sarah Davis, vice president of government affairs for Consolidated Communications.

Fidium’s starting price is $70 per month.

At their headquarters in Portland, they explain why fiber is so fast:

A fiber is about the size of a hair. Very, very thin, and on one end of that fiber is a laser in our central office, on the other end is another laser at the customer’s home, and those lasers communicate by shooting light back and forth at each other. other on the same fiber at the speed of light, which is why it offers such high speeds,” said John Arris, field operations supervisor.

In the pickup truck, Roy has been busy going from house to house and block to block.

We have all 12 connections. Thus, this terminal can have 12 clients working on it. Twelve dedicated fibers,” Roy explained.

Consolidated in particular has a five-year plan to reach more than 400,000 locations in Maine. We started in some of our larger cities in Portlands and Falmouths but have also done very large builds in places you wouldn’t expect Rangeley and the Blue Hill Peninsula and Farmington, New Sharon and Industry and much more rural places in Lisbon Falls, so we were really trying to go out in all areas of the state,” Davis said.

There’s even more good news: Internet options are changing rapidly, so if they’re not in your area today, they might be tomorrow.

#Maine #Internet #Options #Find #Provider

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